Appendix

Appendix 01 – Rider’s clothing

At WeAllRide you wear clothing in which you feel comfortable. Competition clothing is therefore not mandatory. Of course, you have to think about safety for you and your horse. And we also want your horse to be able to ride well. That’s why we have these guidelines:

Appendix 01 Dress

The dress regulations contain a mandatory dress code and an optional dress code. The mandatory dress code is mandatory at all times. As a rider, you are free to choose whether you use the optional dress code. 

The following dress code is mandatory:

1.1 As a general rule Protective Headgear has to be worn by all riders. All colors are allowed.

1.2 Any rider violating this provision must immediately be prohibited from further riding until the protective headgear is properly in place.

2.1 Riding boots or jodhpurs with chaps are required. All colors are allowed.

2.2  Any rider violating this provision must immediately be prohibited from further riding until the riding boots or jodhpurs with chaps are properly in place.

3 A competition uniform is not obligated.

4. Earphones and/or other electronic communication devices are strictly prohibited while riding your test.

The following dress code is optional:

  1. Any single color tailcoat or jacket will be allowed.  
  2. Gloves are allowed in all colors.
  3. Spurs are not compulsory and if worn, must be made of metal. The shank must be either curved or straight pointing directly back from the center of the spur when on the riders’ boot. The arms of the spur must be smooth and blunt. If rowels are used, they must be blunt/smooth (no sharp edges) and free to rotate. Metal spurs with round hard plastic knobs are allowed (“Impuls” spur). “Dummy” spurs with no shank are also allowed.
  4. Use of whip is allowed. The total maximum length of a whip is one meter and twenty (1.20 m)  for pony competitions the maximum length is one meter (1 m). 
  5. Military, Police, etc. may wear civil or service dress at all tests. Service dress does not only apply to Members of the Armed Forces and Police, but also to members and employees/students of other State/Military Establishments and National Studs/schools/institutes. They must comply with all Protective Headgear requirements. 

Wearing a body protector during your test is allowed. This can be worn under or over your shirt, jacket, or coat. In case of bad weather raincoats or rain legs are also allowed.

At WeAllRide you will wear clothing of you own choosing, within the regulations as set above.  Our jury can appreciate an elegant appearance, but it will not directly effect the assessment of the test. Note that in some competitions there can be a prize for best dressed combination. In that case the manor of dressing will be taken into account.

Appendix 02 Tack

At WeAllRide you can choose which saddlery you will use:

  • Dressage saddle
  • Jumping saddle
  • Treeless saddle
  • General purpose saddle

The following components of the saddlery are compulsory:

  1. A saddle, which must be close to the horse. No saddle covers are allowed. The stirrups should be wide enough, so the rider does not get stuck with his feet. For safety reasons, it is not allowed to connect the stirrups or the stirrup leathers to the saddle. 
  2. A double bridle with cavesson noseband, Neither a cavesson nose band nor a curb chain may ever be as tightly fixed so as to harm the Horse. Lip strap and rubber or leather cover for curb chain is optional. Padding is allowed on bridles.
  3. Bits. The bit and curb bit must be made of metal and/or rigid plastic and may be covered with rubber/latex. The lever arm of the curb bit is limited to ten centimetres (10 cm) (length below the mouth piece). The upper cheek must not be longer than the lower cheek. If the curb has a sliding mouthpiece, the lever arm of the curb bit below the mouth piece should not measure more than ten centimetres (10 cm) when the mouth piece is at the uppermost position. Curb “chain” can be made of metal or leather or a combination. Cover for curb “chain” can be made of leather, rubber or sheep skin. The diameter of the mouthpiece of the bridoon and/or curb must be such so as not to hurt the Horse. Minimum diameter of mouthpiece to be twelve millimetres (12 mm) for curb bit and ten millimetres (10 mm) for bridoon bit. Snaffles are permitted as marked on the test sheets. Snaffles used in Young Horse and Children Competitions must have a minimum diameter of fourteen millimetres (14 mm). For Ponies the minimum diameter shall be ten millimetres (10 mm). The diameter of the mouthpiece is measured adjacent to the rings or the cheeks of the mouthpiece. The reins must be attached to the bit. 
  4. Under no circumstances, it is allowed to provide the reins with loops, handles or something similar. The reins may only be attached to the bit. Double reins are not allowed.
  5. Eye caps, ear flaps or other aids that can restrict the horse’s ability to oriënt, such as a fur pad around the cavesson, is not allowed. 
  6. Bandages, tendon boots, fetlock boots or any other form of leg protection are  allowed. 
  7. False tails/tail extensions are permitted. False tails may not contain any metal parts, (except for hooks and eyelets), or extra added weight.
  8. Ear hoods are permitted for all Events, and may also provide noise reduction. However, ear hoods must not cover the horse’s eyes and earplugs are not permitted.
  9. The ear hoods are allowed in any colour and design. 

Appendix 03 Gaits

In assessment of the gaits the jury take close look at the stroke, the relaxation, the position, the impulse, the right-handling of the horse, and, where requested, the collection. The tact and its resilience caused by good back use and the placement of the hindquarters can influence your score. This also examines the ability of the horse to keep the same rhythm and natural balance, which also applies during and after a transition from one gait to another.

Walk

The walk may include several variations, namely, the working walk,  the medium walk, the extended walk, the collected walk, and the free walk. The base of the gait is the marching four-stroke in which the horse moves. This means that the horse lifts its legs, and puts it down again, alternately and separately from each other. The intention is that this gait will be performed with limberness. This means that the movement of the gait should flow through the whole body of the horse.

The medium walk
The working walk is a gait in which the horse moves regularly and actively but in a relaxed manner. Herewith, the walk should be uniform and goal-oriented. The rider is expected to have light and elastic contact with the horse’s mouth, with the support being light and constant.

The free walk
The free walk is a gait between the medium walk and the extended walk. Herewith, the horse should extend his steps, keeping an active and regular pace. He is allowed to get a little longer in the neck but will have to remain relentless. When extending the neck it is not the intention that the rider loses the ‘contact with the mouth’, which means that the reins come loose. The horse should be relaxed and forwards through the whole exercise. 

Extending to the free walk
In the ‘Novice’ and ‘Elementary’ classes, you are asked to extend the walk for a few steps. This means that the horse should make its steps visibly larger, whereby the neck may be lengthened. The rider is expected to keep light and elastic contact with the horse’s mouth. 

The extended walk
When the extended walk is asked, the intention is that the horse makes his steps as big as possible without accelerating too much and losing tact. Limberness must be present and it is desirable for the horse to step freely and well forward with its forelegs, with the hindquarters clearly passing the prints of the forequarters. The neck may be extended and the head may be brought forward more. The rider should not lose contact with the mouth. Furthermore, the rider is expected to have light and elastic contact with the horse’s mouth.

The collected walk
With the collected walk, the horse gets more in hand and moves energetically, powerfully and forward towards the bit. He should be set up to walk with the head approaching the perpendicular. The horse needs to bring his hind legs under the body, whereby the hock will be well bent. The horse’s steps should be smaller, but remain active. The rider is expected to maintain elastic, constant and even contact with the horse’s mouth.

Trot
The trot may consist of several variations, namely the working trot, the medium trot, the extended trot and the collected trot. The base of the gait is a two-stroke movement in which the horse moves forward by alternately depositing the front and rear legs diagonally opposite to each other. Left front and right rear are lifted simultaneously, just like right front and left rear. In between, there is a gliding moment where no leg touches the ground. The trot should be active and regular and should start without hesitation.

The working trot
The working trot is a gait between the collected trot and the medium trot. The horse should move forward with equal and elastic steps, with active hindquarters. The weight of the horse should be evenly distributed over four legs and the horse should be in balance. The rider is expected to have light and elastic contact with the horse’s mouth. 

Extending the trot
In the classes ‘Basic’ and ‘Light’ you are asked to widen the trot steps a few paces. This means that the horse should make its steps visibly larger, whereby the neck may be lengthened appropriately. When extending the neck, the neck of the horse may become slightly longer, with the head of the horse coming a bit more in front of the perpendicular, in comparison to the working trot. The rider is expected to keep light, constant and elastic contact with the horse’s mouth. 

The medium trot
The medium trot is a gait between the working trot and the extended trot. Herewith, the horse should extend the trotting passes. He may be allowed to become a little longer in the neck but will have to remain relentless. When extending the neck it is not the intention that the rider loses the ‘contact with the mouth’, which means that the reins come loose. During the exercise, the horse will have to respond well to the leg aids, he will have to be ridden from back to front. This means that the horse places his hind legs clearly under his body and gets the activity from here.

The extended trot
The extended trot is asked to extend the horse’s steps as much as possible, to the maximum of his ability. Hereby, the horse should stay in balance. The horse should also make use of the driving, active force from the hindquarters. At the transition back to the working trot, the horse should catch up on the hindquarters. The rider is expected to have light and elastic contact with the horse’s mouth.

The collected trot
With the collected trot, it is the intention that the horse makes shorter, more exalted steps than in other trotting species. The horse moves light-footed and with a raised and upwardly arched neck forward. The hindquarters should be more covered because the horse’s hind legs are bent more and are placed under the body. The rider is expected to maintain a light, elastic, and constant contact with the horse’s mouth.

Canter
The canter consists of several variations, namely the working canter, the medium canter, the extended canter, the collected canter, and the false canter. The base of the canter is a three-stroke movement in which the horse places his legs in the left canter as follows: right back, right diagonal, left front, followed by a moment of suspension. In the right canter, this will be: left-back, left diagonal, right front, followed by a moment of suspension.

The working canter
The working canter is a gait between the collected canter and the medium canter. The horse should move in balance, with the strides moving forward and light-footed. Important is that the hindquarters are placed under the body and provide the activity in this gait. The rider is expected to have light and elastic contact with the horse’s mouth.

Extending the canter
In the classes ‘Basic’ and ‘Light’ you are asked to extend the canter. This means that the horse should make its strides visibly larger, whereby the neck may be lengthened appropriately. When extending the neck, the neck of the horse may become slightly longer, with the head of the horse coming a bit more in front of the perpendicular compared to the working canter. The rider is expected to keep light, constant and elastic contact with the horse’s mouth.

The medium canter
With the medium canter, the horse will have to make its strides visible larger. The horse may get a bit longer in the neck, but he will have to remain relentless. When extending the neck it is not the intention that the rider loses the ‘contact with the mouth’, which means that the reins come loose. When riding the middle canter, the intention is that the horse is ridden from back to front. This means that the horse places his hind legs clearly under his body and gets the activity from behind. When transitioning back to the working canter, the horse must not “fall back”, which means that he must also make the transition back from his hind legs. He must, therefore, remain just as active as in the transition to the middle canter.

The extended canter
With the extended canter is the horse is supposed to extend his strides as much as possible, to the maximum of his ability. Hereby the horse should be light-footed, relaxed, and in balance and he needs to get his strength from the hindquarters. At the transition back to the working canter, the horse should catch up on the hindquarters smoothly. The rider is expected to have light and elastic contact with the horse’s mouth.

The collected canter
With the collected gallop, it is the intention that the horse makes shorter, more exalted passes than in other gallops. The horse moves light-footed and with a raised and upwardly arched neck forward. The hindquarters should be more covered because the horse’s hind legs are bent more and are placed under the body. Because the hindquarters carry more weight, the forehand becomes lighter. The rider is expected to maintain a light, elastic and constant contact with the horse’s mouth.

The counter canter
With the counter canter, the intention is that the horse will canter deliberately in the ‘wrong’ canter. This means that the horse canters on the left hand in the right canter and on the right hand in the left canter. The horse may be slightly adjusted and bent in the direction of the canter where it is located. The horse should be in balance and keep the right rhythm and stride.

Appendix 04 Figures

Change of rein

When changing rein, it is the intention that the arena is crossed diagonally from the first letter in the corner after the short side to the letter in the corner before the other short side. This figure can also be ridden via a short diagonal. This can be done from the corner to the B or the E or vice versa. With this figure it is important that the horse, when on the straight line, actually is straight and keeps following its track. 

 

One loop in from the track 

This loop can have a depth of 5 meters or 10 meters. This means that the center of the figure should be 5 or 10 meters in from the track. If one loop of 10 meters is requested, the center point is on the X. The figure should be started in the corner where a straight line to the requested center is ridden. At the center point the horse will have to be adjusted smoothly and then be ridden, with a straight line, back to the track. The horse should walk the entire exercise in the correct position and remain relentless.

 

The volt

The volte 20 meters is called a circle and should be ridden as a large circle at A, C or at E or B. The volt 10 meters is ridden as indicated in the test. A good volt or circle should be round and should not be oval or ovoid. Pay attention, if the circle is ridden at A or C, the corners are not ridden on the track. The intention is that the circle or volt is round at all times, wherever it is ridden. During the riding of the volt the horse should walk with the correct position and bend and is expected to walk with the same position during the whole exercise. 

 

Serpentine

The serpentine is a figure that consists of half-voltes that are connected by a straight connecting line. The amount of arcs that are ridden, depends on the quantity requested in the test. This can be three, four or five arcs. When riding the connecting line, the horse should actually be straightened. When riding the arcs it is expected that the horse will be smoothly adjusted, with the correct position and bend.

To change rein through an S-figure

To change hand through the middle line can also be called ‘changing hand through the middle line’. This figure is ridden by connecting two half-volts of 10 diameters connected with a straight line on the middle line of one horse length. The figure is started by E or B where the connecting line is located on the A-C line.

The eight-figure 

The eight is a figure that consists of two large voltes of equal size, which meet in the middle. The size of the eight to be ridden is indicated in the tests. When changing the horse, the horse should have the correct position and bend. The adjustment of the horse should be done smoothly.

Left and right turn 

The left turn and the right turn  consists of a half volte ten meters that is followed by a straight line to the track. The tests indicate which letter should be marked.

Appendix 05 Exercises

To halt and to rein back 

When halting the intention is that the horse is standing straight and still. Herewith he may not lean on his forehand or hindquarters and he must be able to get back into action immediately if the rider would ask. The jury would like to see that the horse remains in position, with his head light for the perpendicular. The transition to halting needs to be driven as smoothly as possible, keeping the horse active. The halting should not be done by hard or unfriendly aids. Therefore the intention is that the rider gives friendly short aids to make the transition. Furthermore, during the transition it is the intention that the weight of the horse is brought more to its hindquarters by absorbing the forward movements.

 

When reining back, the horse must raise and lower its legs, which are diagonally opposite each other, simultaneously. He must not lean backwards and he must lift his feet high enough so that they do not drag over the ground. The horse must, just as with halting, stay in position. After going backwards  the intention is that the horse immediately goes forward again. He is not allowed to halt again after reining back, but he has to go straight forward . When asked to move forward in trot or canter, this also means that the horse is not allowed to take a few steps in walk before making the requested transition. Here, too, it is important that the horse remains in position and stays active.

 

Leg yielding

When leg yielding, the horse goes sideways and at the same time keeps moving forward. The exercise is started on the A-C line and the horse will move sideways towards the track. The legs on the inside of the horse will cross with the legs on the outside. The horse should remain straight, but may walk with a slight bend. The bend is directed towards the A-C line but is minimal. The horse needs to continue to remain in position throughout the exercise and may not change in head-neck posture.

 

Quarter pirouette

With the quarter pirouette it is, as with the whole and half pirouette, the intention that the horse turns around the hindquarters with its forehand. The hindleg must always be lifted in the canter’s stroke and put down in its own footprint or somewhere in front of it. Specifically with the quarter pirouette, it can be ridden slightly larger than the whole or half pirouette. The horse must canter in the collected canter, making the hind legs a quarter circle with a radius of two meters. Herewith the horse may be slightly bent and canter in a light position to the side where it is turning to. The horse can make two to four gallop jumps when turning.

 

Give and retake the reins 

When asked to give and retake the reins, the horse is supposed to gradually bring his neck forward and down to the perpendicular until full extension of the neck. The head of the horse should be approximately between bow and knee height. The horse should follow the rider’s hand without pulling the reins out of the rider’s hand. The horse may not change pace or regularity. Picking up the reins should be fluently done, with the horse being relaxed, in position and at the right pace. If the horse raises his head for a moment while picking up, but then immediately lowers it again, this is seen as bad.

 

Überstreichen 

The überstreicen in canter is an exercise in which the rider breaks the position about three to four strides, by temporarily bringing both hands about two hand widths over the mane comb. The horse may not change his posture or pace. The horse may put his head slightly in front of the perpendicular. After three to four canters, the rider should quietly return his hands without pulling the horse in his mouth.

 

Shoulder in 

When riding shoulder-in, the intention is that the horse will walk on three tracks. this means that the outer foreleg and the inside hindleg should be on the same line. the front hand of the horse is slightly bent inwards with the correct position and bow. It is not the intention that the horse walks with his head all the way inside. When ridden on the track, the rider will have to let the horse walk in a straight line. If a volte is requested after the shoulder-in, the horse does not have to be straightened first. The volte could then be ridden from the shoulder in. It is important that the exercise is ridden on the letters.

 

Travers

With the travers it is the intention that the horse will run on four tracks. This means that, from the front, all four legs are visible. Herewith, the forehand is on a straight line of the track and the hindquarters are placed inwards and bent in the direction of the movement. The horse has to remain in position at all times and continue at the same pace.

 

To half-pass

During half-passing,, the horse should be ridden forward and sideways. The horse should have a slight bend and position in the direction the horse goes. With this exercise the forehand should go for the hindquarters while the body of the horse remains parallel to the long side. The legs of the horse are put down crosswise, whereby the outer legs are placed in front of the inner legs. The amount of bending required depends on the class. In the higher classes more bending is required than in the lower classes. When half-passing, it is important that the horse moves in a way that he has shoulder freedom. In zigzag half-passes, the rider should smoothly adjust the horse at the center point. This should include position and bending on both sides at the same time. The exercise can be performed in trot or canter.

 

Half turn on the haunches

When half turning on the haunches it is all about making a circle as small as possible. The exercise is performed in walk and it is the intention that the horse  turns around the hindquarters with its forehand. Hereby the inner hind leg, in the rhythm of the walk, is lifted and put down again in almost the same place. During the entire exercise, the horse should walk with a slight position and bend in the direction that he is going.

Simple change

The simple change is an exercise where the horse makes fluent transition from canter into collected walk for 3-4 strides and then make fluent transition into canter again. Important is that the horse maintains its balance and stroke. The hindquarters of the horse should be placed under the horse with the horse raised and correctly in position.

Flying changes

The flying change is an exercise that is performed in the moment of suspension in canter.  This can be a single change, but this exercise can also be performed in a series of four, three or two strides or one by one.. The horse should perform the changes with front and rear legs in the same moment of suspension. Important is that the horse maintains its balance and stroke. The hindquarters of the horse should be placed under the horse with the horse raised and correctly in position. If a single flying change  is requested on the diagonal, it is intended that it is performed before the horse touches the track. If the extended canter or middle canter is requested first, the horse must first be taken back to a more collected canter, after which he can make the change. Herewith the horse may hit the track first before he makes a flying change.

 

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